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Gold Placer Mining





gold placer mining






    placer mining
  • mining valuable minerals from a placer by washing or dredging

  • Placer mining (, also ) is the mining of alluvial deposits for minerals. This may be done by open-pit (also called open-cast mining) or by various forms of tunneling into ancient riverbeds.

  • the mining (by panning or dredging) of alluvial (waterborne) or glacial deposits of precious metals or minerals, usually in stream beds or valleys adjacent to uplands rich in these minerals





    gold
  • A yellow precious metal, the chemical element of atomic number 79, valued esp. for use in jewelry and decoration, and to guarantee the value of currencies

  • A deep lustrous yellow or yellow-brown color

  • made from or covered with gold; "gold coins"; "the gold dome of the Capitol"; "the golden calf"; "gilded icons"

  • amber: a deep yellow color; "an amber light illuminated the room"; "he admired the gold of her hair"

  • coins made of gold

  • An alloy of this











gold placer mining - Placer Gold




Placer Gold Deposits of the Sierra Nevada


Placer Gold Deposits of the Sierra Nevada



The history and geology of the Mother Lode Gold Country of California were well documented in numerous government mineral resource surveys throughout the century. This book compiles data from those reports, long unavailable, in a concise, convenient edition that concentrates on gold placer, hydraulic, and drift mines-giving location information as well as history and past production figures. Covering the mines of the Mother Lode, it also includes the other gold-producing counties of the southern and northern Sierra Nevada range, and the dredging areas of the American, Feather, and Yuban Rivers. More than twenty county maps, this is the complete guide to prospecting the Gold Country of California.










81% (9)





Bear creek miner's cabin




Bear creek miner's cabin





I wish I had a photo of the Bear Creek miner's cabin, but this is the best one I have. The lower roof section to the left in this photo was his cut wood pile storage area. Bunk beds were built against the right hand wall. The ladder on the roof would have helped him clear heavy winter snow when required.

There was a sign on the front door inviting people to use the cabin if they would please leave it as they found it. I went inside the cabin often but never spent a night inside (air was a bit musty).

So here is the background to the photos you will see in this set:

I ran a trap line as a high school student. After walking my trapline many miles before and after school I bought a Honda Trail 55, which opened up lots of opportunities for me in the nearby Cascade Mountains. Areas I had walked, I could now ride to and then park the trail bike and hike farther into the mountains. I LOVED exploring historic and scenic places back then, same as I do now as a retiree.

To reach the Lennox Creek area, I would ride my Honda Trail 55 up to Snoqualmie (you know Twin Peaks country below Mt. Si). Then a long dirt road would take me up the North Fork of the Snoqualmie River. I took many side trips up to lakes and peaks along the way but the Lennox Creek area was always my favorite.

Turning up the Lennox Creek canyon there was (and of course, still is) a sheer cliff above the left bank of the creek. I would watch mountain goat and use binoculars to explore the adits from the old mining days, across the creek.

While in high school I honestly met an old miner with a Gabby Hayes hat, donkey, Santa Claus white beard, and mining supplies neatly lashed to the back of the burro. We talked.

I was told of the mining cabin up Bear Creek and some of the best placer mining for gold up Cougar Creek. I couldn't wait to start hiking and exploring the area. I did so over many years following my high school days.

The mining cabin up Bear Creek had a sign on the door inviting anybody who wanted to use the cabin, to do so, but please leave all belongings there and leave the cabin as found. Simple, fair, and that advice was followed for many years.

The only photos I found of that cabin are in this set and were taken when there was plenty of snow. I can picture the interior of the cabin as if it were yesterday.

We climbed to the top of Bare Mountain as I had done on my own, the first time I visited the area.

The other mining area was harder to find. The first time I tried to hike up Cougar Creek (with Cougar Lake or Goat Lake on my mind), I found no trail on the right bank but plenty of devil's club; downsloped alder; downed timber; big boulders and all other obstacles you could imagine. Then I found the miner's trail on the north side of Cougar Creek (left bank).

I remember the magis of hiking on my own and finding the old cabin with window glass in place and looking good. Since it didn't have an invite note on the door, I never went into it.

A cleverly designed cache shed was leaning but standing near the cabin. It had cedar rail shelves, which I was told was where a placer miner would store his dynamite boxes to keep the "powder dry".

I still have one of the old wooden dynamite box sides (mortis and tendon joints) from the scrap pile around the cabin.

Black lettering on the wooden boxes is barely legible:

ICC-14
High Explosives
Dangerous
Pacific Powder Co.
Tenino, Wash.

Later I took my wife up to show her the cabins and I also took a backpacking (bushwhacking) trip up from the cabin to Cougar Lake. The lake was frozen over and we had a real adventure getting up the cliffs to the lake.

So some of the photos in this set are of Bear Creek and Bear Mountain the others are from Cougar Creek . Both creeks are tributaries of the lovely pool basin Lennox Creek.

There was lots of mining equipment (big and heavy) up the Bear Creek canyon back then. Most is probably still there.

The photos were taken with an inexpensive film camera but I hope those of you interested in the area can overlook the photo qualities and enjoy the trip back in time to an area with a rich history.

OldManTravels.

Most photos in this set were taken in the mid-1970s.











Heading up Bare Mountain




Heading up Bare Mountain





Soft snow made easy step kicking up Bare Mountain. Later I would watch an avalanche roar off the steep slopes above lower Lennox Creek. Had I seen that display of power first, I might not have been headed up this slope. Snow did seem stable though.

Ken took this photo. I'm in the green down jacket. Bob is in the red down jacket. Bob passed away not too long after this hike leaving behind his wife and young son.

So here is the background to the photos you will see in this set:

I ran a trap line as a high school student. After walking my trapline many miles before and after school I bought a Honda Trail 55, which opened up lots of opportunities for me in the nearby Cascade Mountains. Areas I had walked, I could now ride to and then park the trail bike and hike farther into the mountains. I LOVED exploring historic and scenic places back then, same as I do now as a retiree.

To reach the Lennox Creek area, I would ride my Honda Trail 55 up to Snoqualmie (you know Twin Peaks country below Mt. Si). Then a long dirt road would take me up the North Fork of the Snoqualmie River. I took many side trips up to lakes and peaks along the way but the Lennox Creek area was always my favorite.

Turning up the Lennox Creek canyon there was (and of course, still is) a sheer cliff above the left bank of the creek. I would watch mountain goat and use binoculars to explore the adits from the old mining days, across the creek.

While in high school I honestly met an old miner with a Gabby Hayes hat, donkey, Santa Claus white beard, and mining supplies neatly lashed to the back of the burro. We talked.

I was told of the mining cabin up Bear Creek and some of the best placer mining for gold up Cougar Creek. I couldn't wait to start hiking and exploring the area. I did so over many years following my high school days.

The mining cabin up Bear Creek had a sign on the door inviting anybody who wanted to use the cabin, to do so, but please leave all belongings there and leave the cabin as found. Simple, fair, and that advice was followed for many years.

The only photos I found of that cabin are in this set and were taken when there was plenty of snow. I can picture the interior of the cabin as if it were yesterday.

We climbed to the top of Bare Mountain as I had done on my own, the first time I visited the area.

The other mining area was harder to find. The first time I tried to hike up Cougar Creek (with Cougar Lake or Goat Lake on my mind), I found no trail on the right bank but plenty of devil's club; downsloped alder; downed timber; big boulders and all other obstacles you could imagine. Then I found the miner's trail on the north side of Cougar Creek (left bank).

I remember the magis of hiking on my own and finding the old cabin with window glass in place and looking good. Since it didn't have an invite note on the door, I never went into it.

A cleverly designed cache shed was leaning but standing near the cabin. It had cedar rail shelves, which I was told was where a placer miner would store his dynamite boxes to keep the "powder dry".

I still have one of the old wooden dynamite box sides (mortis and tendon joints) from the scrap pile around the cabin.

Black lettering on the wooden boxes is barely legible:

ICC-14
High Explosives
Dangerous
Pacific Powder Co.
Tenino, Wash.

Later I took my wife up to show her the cabins and I also took a backpacking (bushwhacking) trip up from the cabin to Cougar Lake. The lake was frozen over and we had a real adventure getting up the cliffs to the lake.

So some of the photos in this set are of Bear Creek and Bear Mountain the others are from Cougar Creek . Both creeks are tributaries of the lovely pool basin Lennox Creek.

There was lots of mining equipment (big and heavy) up the Bear Creek canyon back then. Most is probably still there.

The photos were taken with an inexpensive film camera but I hope those of you interested in the area can overlook the photo qualities and enjoy the trip back in time to an area with a rich history.

OldManTravels.

Most photos in this set were taken in the mid-1970s.









gold placer mining








gold placer mining




Arizona Gold Placers and Placering (Prospecting and Treasure Hunting)






This is a reprint of the classic Arizona Bureau of Mines publication on gold placers in Arizona. Locations are listed by county, giving a summary of the geology and history of gold production. An excellent overview of small scale gold placering follows with facts about gold and how to find gold. Includes detailed information about gold pans, sluices, cradle rockers and long toms. The final section of the book includes information on selling gold, legislation concerning prospecting, and the southwestern environs.










See also:

thin gold chain necklace

silkroad gold guide

gold band for men

18k gold herringbone necklace

18 k white gold chain

navionics gold cartography

gold bullion bar ingot



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